Wednesday, June 27, 2007

Getting used to looking like a nutjob - 気違いみたいに見られることに慣れること。

Weather: Cloudy; 65°F
Energy Level: 3.5 out of 10 (climbing!)
Mood: Kind of sad :-(
(...Maybe feeling the aftereffects of gluten and feeling bad has something to do with it, though.)


Up to this point, other than the brief period in my life when I had a fixed broken cheekbone and half my face paralyzed, (I think) I've looked pretty normal to others for the most part.

Now that I've opened up the Pandora's box that is flavoring/coloring in foods and drinks, eating out or just getting a simple drink from a coffee shop has suddenly become increasingly difficult - most of the time I look like a crazy person.

I'll give you an example.

Today I was at the UW clinic to meet with the healthcare psychologist and physical therapist for the FMS Research Program. I found out I had 15 minutes between the two separate meetings, so I figured I'd get myself a cup of tea at the little coffee shop inside the clinic.

I guess I should've aimed for something simple like black tea or water, but being a variety seeker, inevitably I craved Chai tea. (I have some irregular heartbeat or something, so my doctor told me to avoid coffee - decaf or normal - which makes my heartbeat funky.) But here's the question: what's in their Chai mix? (The sticky point being every place could use something different.)

So I asked (I figured this info would come in handy in the future) to see the ingredients on the huge pump bottle they brought out, and there they were, those evil two words: "natural flavoring." What does that come from? For all you know, it could come from malt (barley) or glutamate (wheat). Damn it.

Then I moved onto the tea list. Chinese White Plum - that sounds good. Can I see the ingredients list? The employees don't even know where that might be located - oh, it's on the individual tea bags, not on the box. I pull out a tea bag. "Natural Flavor." Never mind; that doesn't work, either. Orange Spice? That doesn't work, either. Okay, I'll just have English Breakfast (decaf), please.

By this time there are people in the line looking at me - I let some people go ahead, but in their busy lives, they are clearly annoyed and don't have time for this nonsense. They're probably thinking, "what's this paranoid lady doing?" I feel like turning back to explain to everyone - "You see, I have this thing called celiac disease, and I have to be very careful or I'd get sick." But then they're probably not that interested in the reason for my craziness, and they might also think, "Then why don't you just get water or something? Why didn't you bring something with you?"

I guess I still want spontaneity in my life, as well as variety (also I can't plan for everything). But how do I balance that with being looked at like a crazy person each time I seek new/varied experience?

Daniel has shared with me much of the trauma, I must say. When I'm feeling not up to getting up and about, he sometimes gets me food from the nearby Japanese restaurant. He's had to ask a lot of questions - each time we learned something new about a potential gluten-containing ingredient. "Is your rice vinegar made with all rice, or with other grains?" "Do you pickle your own ginger or do you buy in bulk?" (if bought from a wholesaler it almost always contains "flavors/amino acids.") "Does your wasabi contain any wheat?"

(I couldn't really blame restaurant employees if they thought we are a pain in a butt. I might have thought the same thing a decade or so ago in my youth, when I had been a restaurant employee, if such a customer had shown up.)

A lot of times, restaurant employees are not the best English speakers, whether we go to a Thai or Vietnamese or Japanese restaurant (although at least at Japanese restaurants I can try to explain - even then it's hard to get the concept across). So when we say "gluten," it doesn't really register. "Wheat" goes much easier, but the thing is, it's not just wheat. Also with imported foods, labeling is not the best, either.

Asking to see their bottle of fish sauce seems a bit over the top, so we usually ask, "is there any wheat in it?" - knowing in the back of our heads that question may not cover all the bases. We need to learn about food preparations and ingredients much more, so we can foresee what might be dangerous in a dish. Otherwise at every place I might have to order a plain lump of chicken with a side of steamed vegetables. Appetizing, no?

I've also bought and tried these "dining cards" which describe gluten and celiac disease in different languages, so I can show it to restaurant staff. A lot of times they just glance at it, not really read it, and kind of give us a weird look saying, "so what do you want exactly?" I'm sure they're being as helpful as their time allows. I feel like shrinking at that point, imagining them thinking, "so why did you decide to eat out as opposed to eating in?"

And cooking has not been the easiest of things to do with fibromyalgia. It hurts my legs and feet to stand; hurts my wrist and back to reach and get ingredients out; hurts my neck and back to bend over to wash things; hurts my fingers to hold the knife; hurts my arms to chop; hurts my shoulders to watch over pots. By the end my body is aching everywhere, and I sometimes feel like "why did I start this, again?"

So I might eat (gluten-free) cereal for lunch. Either that or I'll just have to learn to grow a thicker skin, so I'm used to being looked at like a nutjob (being a variety-seeking glutton, I have a feeling that's what I need to do). I am learning how to cope with pain better and also relax my muscles so I don't brace myself and tense up before/with pain (which results in more sore muscles) - so maybe I'll feel good enough on some days to cook.

Maybe I'll watch that old movie, "Mixed Nuts," although I don't even remember what it's about. At least I'll be distracted from pain for a bit, and maybe I could feel like I can be a happy nut.
-A

天候: 曇り; 18°C
元気度: 3.5/10 (ちょっと上昇中!)
気分: ちょっと悲しいかも :-(
(・・・でもグルテンを食べたことで体の調子が悪いのが気分に影響してるのかも知れない。)

恐らく今まで(若いときちょっとの間頬骨をこっぴどく折ったのを治して
顔が半分麻痺してた以外は)、私は見た目ごく普通のひとだったと思う。

でも「調味料」と「着色料」という2つのパンドラの箱を開けてしまったおかげで、
突如、外食するにしても、カフェで単に飲み物を注文するにしても、
被害妄想を持った変なひとのように見えることが多くなった。

そのいい例。

今日はワシントン大学のFMS治療法研究プログラムの一環で、
健康管理カウンセラーと理学療法士と会う予約があったのだが、
2つの予約の間に15分ほど間があると行ってから分かったので、
クリニックの中にあるコーヒーカウンターでお茶でも飲むことにした。

さてここからが問題。 (普通の紅茶かお水にしとけば良かったんだけど。)
お医者さんによると不整脈だかなんだかで、普通のコーヒー(カフェインフリーも
かなりカフェインがあるそうな)は飲めない。 いろいろその時によって
気分が変わるたちなので、今日はチャイティーが飲みたくなった。
しかしチャイティーは既成のミックスから作られる。
ここのチャイミックスには何が入っているのだろう? 
調味料は含まれているのか? (カフェによっても違うからまたややこしい。)

そこで、この情報はまた来たときに役立つだろうとも思い、原材料に何が
含まれているか聞くことにする。 もちろん従業員は、何が入っているかなんて
知ったこっちゃない。大きな業務用の入れ物を見せてもらう。 
そこには憎むべき言葉:「天然調味料」。 ("natural flavors") 
いったい「天然調味料」ってなんやねん? 
麦芽関連の甘味料かも知れないし、小麦関連の調味料かも知れない。 
(グルタミン酸とか。) 残念。

今度は紅茶のリストに移ることにする。 チャイニーズホワイトプラムティー・・・
それ美味しそうね。 原材料リスト見せてもらえる? 従業員はそれが
どこにあるか知らない。 ティーバッグの内袋にあるのを発見。 
それを引っ張り出して見る。 はあ、これも「天然調味料」入り、駄目でした。 
オレンジスパイスはどうかしら? これも駄目でした。 
うーん、ごめんなさい、じゃあなんでもないイングリッシュ・ブレックファストに
させていただきます。

こうして一つ一つ見ていくたび、後ろの列の人達はいったい何をしとるんだ、と
いう感じでじろじろ見る。 お先にどうぞ、と言っても、みんな忙しそうに、
こんなナンセンスにつきあってる暇はないわ、という感じで見る。 

多分、「いったいこの被害妄想にとりつかれてるような女は何をしているんだ」
とでも思っているだろう。 振り向いて、「ごめんなさい、セリアック病という
自己免疫疾患で、気をつけないと具合が悪くなるんです」とでも
言いたいけれど、あんまり意味がないだろうし、説明しても「じゃあなんで
ミネラルウォーターとかもっと簡単なものを注文するか、自分でなんか
持ってこないのよ?」と思われるのがおちだと思う。

でもなんでも予測して計画をたてられるわけじゃないし、自発性のある
生活がしたい。 ときにはふっと暇が出来たときにお茶のひとつも飲みたい。 
そんな人並の自由やいつも同じではない体験を求める気持ちと、
それを求める度に気違いみたいに見られることとのバランスをとるのは難しい。

ダニエルは私のそんな苦い経験を一緒に、というか、私のいないところでも
分かち合ってくれている。 私が体調が悪くてあんまり料理をしたり出かける
状態でないときに、近所の日本食レストランなどから大丈夫そうなものを
買ってきてくれるから。 これまでレストランの人に、グルテンについて
新しいことを学ぶたび、いろいろな質問をしてくれてきた。 
「こちらで使っているお酢はお米と水だけの米酢ですか、それとも
穀物酢ですか?」 「ガリはこちらで漬けてらっしゃるんでしょうか、それとも
卸業者から買ってらっしゃるんでしょうか?」(これは卸業者から仕入れる場合
アミノ酸・調味料が入っているから。) 「わさびには乳化剤とかで小麦が
入ってるんでしょうか?」

(面倒くさい客だな~、と思われてもしょうがないと思う。
私も昔レストランで働いていたときにこんな客が来たら、
う~ん面倒だ、と思ったかも知れない。)

おうおうにして、特にアジア系のレストランでは全ての従業員が流暢な
英語を話す訳ではないので、「グルテン」というところからよくよく
説明せねばならない。(日本人なら日本語で説明をしようとすることは
出来るけれど、例え言葉のバリヤーがなくてもコンセプトをなかなか
分かってもらえないことが多い。) 「グルテン」と言うと、「はあ?」とくるし、
「小麦」は分かってもらえる場合が多いけれど、小麦だけではないので
話がややこしい。しかも輸入された原料の場合、原材料のリストも
いい加減なので話がもっとややこしくなる。

「ちょっとお宅の魚醤のビンを見せて下さい」とかいちいち言って
出してきてもらうのもなんだか気がひけるので、大抵の場合、
「小麦は入ってないですよね?」で済ませてしまってきた。 
でも頭の中では、それだけではまだかなり危うい部分がある、
と分かっているのだけれど。 

多分いろいろな料理の調理法や、使われる材料、調味料について、
私自身がいろいろ勉強する必要があるのだと思う。
そうでなければ、行く場所行く場所、なんにも調味料をつけないで
焼いた鶏肉と、これまたなにも味をつけない蒸した野菜でも頼む羽目になる。 
それはあんまり食欲をそそるものではない。

いろいろな言語で「グルテン」がどんなものに入っているか説明してある
カードなども買ってみたけれど、たいていの場合レストランのスタッフは
それをさっと見て、変な顔をし、「それで、いったいどんなものが
食べられないわけ?」と聞いてくるのがオチ。 そうよね、忙しいのに、
そんなにふんふん、と詳しく勉強していられないよね、と思う。
この時点で私は穴があったら入りたくなる。 きっと、「こんなにややこしいなら
なんで家で食べないで、外食しに来たわけ?」と言われてるようで。

でも、線維筋痛症になってから、料理をするのも並大抵のことではなくなった。
台所に立つには足(と脚)が痛むし、材料を棚や冷蔵庫から取るには手首や
背中が痛む。 野菜を洗うのに前かがみになると首や腰が痛むし、包丁を
持つのは指が痛い。 ものを切るのには腕が痛むし、お鍋やフライパンを
見ていると肩が痛む。 料理をし終わる頃には体中ひどく痛くなって、
「なんでこんなことやり始めたんだろう?」と後悔することが多い。

だからお昼ご飯には、(幸いグルテンフリーの)シリアルでも食べようかな、
と思ってしまったりする。 気違いのように扱われるのに慣れるには、もっと
ずうずうしくなることが必要だ。 (いろいろ食べるのが好きな私としては、
それより道がないと思う。) 「痛い!」と思ったときに肩をすぼめたり、
筋肉や関節を緊張させたりするとよけい凝って痛くなるので、
どうしたら筋肉を意図的にリラックスできるか、痛みとどうしたら
気持ち的にもっと仲良く共存していけるかも、勉強している最中。 
それが上手くなっていけば、気分が比較的良くて、
鼻歌を歌いながら料理ができる日も来るだろう。

昔の映画、「ミックスド・ナッツ」(ナッツは気違いとかちょっと変な人、という
意味もあるので、いろんな変な人、とナッツ・ミックスとかけた洒落。
変な人がいっぱい出てくる)でも見ようかな~。 どんな話かもよく
覚えていないけれど、痛みからの気分転換にはなるだろうし、
幸せな気違いならまあいいか、と思えるかも知れないから。

2 comments:

Groverkitty said...

Instead of focusing on what you can't have, try focusing on what you CAN. Maybe you can make a list of everything you love to eat that doesn't contain gluten and all the restaurants that you know you can enjoy things at. Since you do ask questions at various places, I'll bet you already know what you can have and what you enjoy eating.

My mom is allergic to tomatoes, potatoes and eggplant. It's not as hard as gluten allergy, but you'd be surprised how many things she can't eat. She has the same problem going out to restaurants. She always has to say, I'm allergic to all this, can you ask the cook not to put any of those things in my food?

It sounds difficult, but who cares what other people think? You should be proud of yourself for standing your ground and finding things you can have :) It's not their lives you have to worry about, it's yours and your doing a good job!

Aya said...

Thanks Gabi - I think I was feeling a bit weak yesterday because I wasn't feeling well. I'm happy again today that I CAN have the Rainier cherries in season! Woo hoo.