Monday, June 25, 2007

"Flavoring" = Russian roulette - 「調味料」の、バカ!

Weather: Fair!; 62°F
Energy Level: 3 out of 10

Yes, mom (in Calais), I am still somewhat "sunburned" :-) My also gluten intolerant friend Gwynn was wise in saying, "[After going through similar mistakes] I'd decided, 10 minutes of pleasure - I don't care how good - is not worth 4 days of my life." (As told to me after the bulgogi incident - which she called "a little R&D.")

I have been extremely sleepy and drained, and reading one of my favorite blogs Gluten-Free Girl, I realized other celiacs feel extreme sleepiness too when they eat gluten - among other things.

I get asked a lot what contains gluten, and Shauna James (the Gluten-Free Girl - one of my inspirations for this blog), being a writer, explains much better than I would in her "what the heck is gluten anyway?" post, so if I may, I'll skip typing virtually the same thing. (I might ask her if I can translate it someday for the Japanese portion of this blog, though.)

One thing I learned from her post (I'd read it before, but not with as much attention) is that food manufacturers are NOT required to list things they put ON the food. Yes, they are required to list what's IN the food, but not ON the food. If, say, Junior Mints candies' ingredients don't look bad to me, the candies could still be dusted with wheat or similar flour to prevent sticking. Yes. Even if they are corn tortillas, they could be dusted with wheat flour! Shauna once got sick from TWO Starbucks chocolate-covered coffee beans, which didn't list anything suspicious as an ingredient. Blast. So now I'm officially paranoid of any packaged food that comes in pieces.

Now that I've really felt the punishment (day 3+ and my stomach is still growling at me with each breath), I've been scrutinizing things in our fridge. Not that I didn't do that before, when I was diagnosed - but I must admit I have a soft spot for import foods, namely, Asian (Japanese, Korean, etc.) foods, so I was a little easy on them. ("This is probably OK...")

If everything went by the U.S. standards enforced starting in 2004 (or was it 2005?), things containing one of the eight major allergens would list any wheat used in the ingredients list, but that's not the end of the story, so I have to read every letter. (Wheat allergy is not equal to celiac since we can't eat gluten.) Because as Shauna says, other than the obvious sources like wheat, barley, rye, oats (oat grains themselves should not contain gluten but most oats are contaminated as they are processed/grown in the same places as wheat; you can get gluten-free oats here however), spelt (people with wheat allergy can eat spelt but not celiacs), durum, couscous, semolina, kamut, and triticale, gluten can be in things like (in no particular order):
  • alcohol
  • grain vinegar
  • fillers in processed meat, frozen foods
  • soy sauce (except wheat-free tamari)
  • miso (can often contain barley)
  • caramel coloring
  • "natural" and artificial flavors
  • modified food starch
  • MSG
  • lecithins
  • textured vegetable protein in veggie meats
  • emulsifiers
  • drugs and vitamins
  • maltodextrin ("most" in the U.S. is made from corn - imported foods are more mysterious - but why take the chance when it's not clear?)
  • "amino acids"
The actual list of everything forbidden is about two pages long, so I won't bore you here.

And food labels will not say on there what these things may be derived from (i.e. barley for caramel coloring). So one day last month after I got sick(er), we panicked when we realized we bought a bottle of juice that said "natural flavors." Juice! You would think I can drink those care-free, but not always. I called some companies to ask what these "natural flavors" were made from; some were helpful, but other times the customer service reps sounded unsure - so I just avoid those.

Then there are other companies like Ricola (which I love when I have sore throat), who say on their website that their product is "99% gluten-free." (They are basically saying, "well, we didn't tell you it was 100% gluten-free!" to cover their butts in case someone gets sick.) What the heck does that mean? I'm guessing they may or may not dust the candies with flour or another similar substance.

The thing that plagues me the most is "flavors" or "amino acids" that are rampant in Asian foods. One of those amino acids can be glutamate (a.k.a. glutamic acid). Yes, the name sounds ominous, and it is indeed bad news. It's something used to make MSG, but can also be used as a standalone flavoring. In 1908 this famed chemistry professor at Tokyo Imperial University (now University of Tokyo, my dad's alma mater), Kikunae Ikeda, found that one of the chemical roots behind umami (savoriness) in konbu seaweed was glutamate, and also patented the manufacture of MSG (in 1909 with a Japanese company, Ajinomoto).

Some in Japan say that "flavor enhancer" (or MSG) was one of the 10 greatest inventions from Japan. I respect that his intellectual curiosity led him to this discovery, but I despise what happened afterward (some of this is very personal of course)! We all know that chemically produced MSG is bad for us and kills our taste buds - why, why did they have to make it into a runaway product?

The original patented product - Ajinomoto - does not seem to contain gluten, as they say their "amino acids" are derived from cane sugar. (It contains "food starch," though, which makes it a gluten suspect.) But there are a slew of other companies in Japan and China (largest producer around) who make glutamate from a wheat-derived source or other similar grains. To make matters worse, imported foods don't adhere to the same standards as the foods in the U.S., so the labels are always sketchy. It may say "flavor," it may say "amino acids," or sometimes it says nothing at all but may still have these things. (I look at Japanese food products whose labels I can read, and I can often spot a discrepancy between the Japanese version of ingredient list and the English version - so I imagine the situation is similar for other Asian products.)

Just when did people decide that everything needed additional "flavoring"? Weren't natural flavors of things enough? I think this is a lesson in greed: too much of a good thing is bad.

I'm respecting my maternal grandmother more and more nowadays (although for years she made these "wellness pills" partially from eggs which I was unknowingly allergic to - she only wanted best for us). When I was little, she took me to this co-op workshop where we learned how added coloring was unnecessary and bad for us, and she was a stickler for everything natural. Packaged ramen? Tragedy! Packaged candies? Eat fruits.

Grandmothers do know the best.

Tonight I've discovered my beloved umeboshi (salted, pickled plums) and other things in our fridge contained "amino acids." (Just exactly WHAT amino acids?) My trash may be bigger tomorrow, but for now I'm fantasizing I can still eat them if I so desire.
-A

P.S. To those of you who are diagnosed with mysterious "irritable bowel syndrome" (IBS) and/or migraines: Under a nutritionist/dietitian's guidance, you might try going without one of suspect food allergens one by one, or gluten in an "elimination diet" - a lot of undiagnosed celiacs are misdiagnosed with IBS and migraines.

P.P.S. I think I found the culprit in Ricola candies - "color (caramel)"!!! I don't know how I missed that before. They present themselves like such an all-natural-ish company - with all those swiss herbs - yet they had to add coloring. Dang it.

天候: 晴れ! 17°C
元気度: 3/10

引き続き体で学んでいます。

知り合いの(彼女もグルテンが食べられない)グエンさんの言うとおり。
「私も失敗をしたあと自分に言い聞かせたのは、
10分間の楽しみには、いくら美味しくてもよ、4日間の人生を
無駄にするほどの価値はないってこと。」
(さらにブルゴギ事件を「ちょっとした戦略開発研究ね~」とも。)

判断力を欠いて焼肉を食べて以来
ほにゃら~っと眠くていつもより疲れてしょうがなかったのですが、
私の好きな Gluten-Free Girl (グルテンフリーガール)の
ブログを読んでいて、他のセリアック病の人も
グルテンを食べるとこうなることが分かりました。

グルテンって何に入ってるの?と聞かれることが多いのですが、
グルテンフリーガールのショーナ・ジェームズさんは作家ということもあり
私より説明が上手なので、同じことを繰り返すよりは
彼女の書き込みを見てください。 (疲れてて怠けている。)
what the heck is gluten anyway? (グルテンっていったい何?)
今度許可がもらえたら、日本語に訳してみようかとも思います。

前も読んだのですが、注意深く読んでいなかったらしく、
今日彼女の書き込みから学んだことは、
食品製造業者はその食品の中に含まれている
原材料は明記する義務があるものの、
まぶしたものなど、その表面についているものについては
同じ義務がないこと。

ヒェ~。
例えば、粒チョコレートなどを買った場合、
チョコ同士がくっつかないように少し粉をまぶす
場合があるので、たとえ原材料を見て大丈夫、と
思っても危ないということです。
現にショーナさんはスタバのチョココーヒー豆を食べて(二粒!)
具合が悪くなったそう。 (原材料に悪いものはなかった。)
コーントルティーヤなどを買っても、
ひっつかないよう小麦粉が使われているかも
しれないということ。 ショック。
なんか包装されている全てのものが危うく見えてきました。

焼肉を食べた罪に対する罰を体感しつつ、
(3日目だけどまだお腹は息をする度グルグル怒っている。)
冷蔵庫の中をもう少し慎重に点検してみました。
前も診断されたときに同じことはしたつもりだったのですが、
アジア系の食べ物が好きな私としては、
「うーん、これは多分大丈夫よね~」と
日本から来たものやアジア系スーパーで買ったものには
ちょっと甘かったのです。 (捨てたくなかった。)

2004年(2005年だったかな?)からアメリカでは、
出来るだけ、食品製造業者は一番多い8つのアレルギー源を
使ったら原材料リストに明記するよう法律が変わりました。
(あんまり厳しい罰がある訳でもないので100%信用は出来ない。)
だから小麦はその中に入っているのですが、
セリアック病と小麦アレルギーとはまた違うので、
セリアックと診断されたからにはグルテンを食べないよう
原料を1個1個全て読む必要があります。

ショーナさんの言うように、見て明らかな
小麦、大麦、はと麦(はと麦自体にはグルテンは含まれないものの、
小麦と一緒に生産・処理加工されていることが殆どなので
避けなければいけない。 でもグルテンフリーのはと麦が買える
サイトはあり。 そば麦も同じ工場で処理加工
されている場合混じっていてダメ)、ライ麦、スペルト小麦、
デュラム小麦、クスクス、セモリナ、カムート、ライ小麦の他に、
グルテンは下記のようなものにも隠れています。
  • アルコール
  • 穀物酢
  • 麦芽、小麦胚芽
  • 冷凍食品やちくわなどに使われる充てん剤
  • 醤油 (小麦を使わないたまり醤油を除く)
  • 味噌 (麦が入っていたりする)
  • 着色料、カラメル色素
  • 調味料
  • 食品用でんぷん
  • グルタミン酸ナトリウム
  • レシチン
  • 植物たん白
  • 乳化剤
  • ビタミン剤も含む医薬品
  • マルトデキストリン (北米で作られているものはとうもろこし原料のものが多いものの、全てではなく、海外、特にアジアで生産されたものは不明なことが多い。)
  • アミノ酸
実際避けなければいけないもののリストは2ページにわたるので、
ここでは全部書きません。 (こちらを参照)

原材料のラベルには上記のようなもの(例えばカラメル色素は麦が原料)が
いったい何の原料から作られているのかは書いてありませんから、
話がややこしくなります。

そんなことがあるので、先月いつもより具合が悪くなったとき、
食べた物を全てチェックして原材料に「天然調味料」と書いてある
ジュースを発見したときはちょっと二人でパニックを起こしました。
まさか、 ジュースが体に悪いとは思わなかったからです。
飲み物くらい気にしないで飲めても、と思いますが、
そういう訳にもいきません。

そこでジュースの製造・販売元に何件か電話をかけて、
「この "natural flavors" の原料は何?」と聞いたのですが、
お客様相談室係のひとが分かっている場合もあれば、
なんだかあやしい場合もあります。
あやふやな場合はそのジュースは避けなければ
いけません。

他に、ハーブキャンディ(喉が痛むとき好きなんだけど)を
作っているリコラ社などの場合は、ホームページに
「当社の商品は99%グルテンフリーです」などと
書いてあります。 それって・・・と思うのですが、
誰か具合が悪くなったら罪を逃れられるよう、
逃げ道を作っているのかな、とも思います。

一番困るのは、アジア系の食品、特に日本食に多い
「調味料」または「アミノ酸等」です。
そう書いてある場合、グルタミン酸が入っている
可能性が非常に高いから。

グルタミン酸はお察しの通り、グルタミン酸ナトリウム(MSG)を
作る原料です。 1908年に東京帝国大学の池田菊苗教授
昆布の旨み成分の一部がグルタミン酸であることを発見、
1909年特許をとって「味の素」の誕生となった訳ですが・・・

旨み調味料の発見は日本の10大発明の一つ、とか
いう説もありますが、(個人的な要素が強いけど)
私は悲しい! 化学を探求するものとして、
昆布の旨みを研究しよう、と思ったのは尊敬できるの
ですが、その後なぜ商品化されて大ヒットしてしまったのでしょう。
合成調味料は体にも悪いし、味覚を麻痺させてしまうのに。

元祖「味の素」自体のアミノ酸はサトウキビを化成させて
作られるようなので大丈夫かも知れないのですが、
(でも「食品用でんぷん」も入っているので詳しくは不明)
日本や中国(もちろんアジアで一番多い生産量)で
作られているアミノ酸系調味料のグルタミン酸の中には
小麦や他の穀物から作られるものも多く、その場合
グルテンがばっちり入っていることになります。

さらに、アメリカに他国から輸入される食品の場合
国内で生産される食品と同じ規制が課せられないので、
原材料のリストはだんだんあやしくなってきます。
(日本語は読めるので英語版と日本語版の
原材料リストを比べてみると、間違いや
いいかげんな表記がよく見つかります。中国語のもので
漢字を見ると、他のアジア諸国から輸入される食品も
表記が全部合っていない場合が多いみたいです。)

どうして、いつ人は、自然の食べ物が持っている
味の上に「調味料」が必要だと決めたんでしょうね。
これは、いくら良いものでも、自然に反して量が多すぎれば
体に害になるという、欲に関する教訓だと思います。

(昔「美味しんぼ」の中に、今の日本人はみんな化学調味料で
舌が麻痺してしまって、味の分かるアメリカ人のブラックさんより
本当のだしの旨みが感じられないという話がありましたね~。
私の主人も「調味料」が入ったお漬物は嫌いです。)

最近特に、母方の祖母は偉かったなあ、としみじみ感じます。
(湿疹とか出ない種類の卵アレルギーだとは知らなかったので、
健康の為、と卵の入った手作りのお薬を作ってくれたのは
まずかったかも知れないけれど・・・良かれと思って
一生懸命作ってくれたので有難いです。)
私が小さいとき、彼女は着色料がいかに不必要で
体に悪いか学ぶセミナーに連れて行ってくれました。
自家製の、自然のものを一番大事にする女性でした。
彼女にとって、インスタントラーメンなどは人類の悲劇。
お菓子屋さんで買う色つきのキャンデーを食べるくらいなら、
西瓜を食べるべき。

おばあちゃんの知恵は正しいことが多いのですね (^_^)

今夜の点検で、大好きな梅干やラッキョウも「アミノ酸」入りと判明。 
(何から作った、何のアミノ酸~?)
明日のごみはいつもより多いかも知れませんが、
今日のところは食べたければ食べられる、と夢見ながら寝ます。

P.S. 原因不明の過敏性腸炎や偏頭痛に悩まされている方:
栄養士さんの指導のもとに食生活を点検して、食べた後(1~2日後でも)
具合が悪くなる食品群があれば、1つ1つ食生活から排除して
具合を見る除外食試験をしてみるといいかも知れません。 
診断される前のセリアック病患者は多くの場合、過敏性腸炎や
偏頭痛と誤診されているので。

P.P.S. ハーブキャンディーの何が悪いか(多分)分かりました。。。
(カラメル)色素("color (caramel)")! あーんなに「自然のハーブの~」
みたいな調子で売っておきながら、美味しそうな色を加えてるのですねー。

2 comments:

Yifat said...

hi there,
i used to be a 留学生in Japan and i love cooking japanese food. My cousin has celiac and she asked me if she could use miso for cooking.
i've been trying to find some japanese recipes for her, but i couldnt find anything.
can you help with a list of japanese ingrdients?
thanks,
yifat

Aya said...

Hi yifat,

I'm sorry, I didn't realize you had left a comment, until now (months later -- now it's Feb 2008 -- I didn't have it set up so it notifies me when I get a comment)! Do you still need help? If you do, email me at besttoro@yahoo.com.

Aya